What Is the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) of a Polymer, and Why Does It Matter to Me?

Posted by Dan Griffin on Apr 29, 2020 10:00:00 AM

image: Plastic transitioning from solid to amorphous

One of the most common terms that you hear when discussing polymers used as adhesives and coatings is the “glass transition temperature” (often abbreviated Tg). This property is in fact one of the most critical to consider when choosing the correct material for your application. Since many of us never got further than high school physics and chemistry, this term can be a little confusing and deserves explanation.

A layman’s definition of the glass transition temperature of a polymer is the temperature at which an amorphous polymer moves from a hard or glassy state to a softer, often rubbery or viscous state.

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Topics: Epoxy Adhesives, Glass Transition, Adhesive Solutions, Polymers, Curable Adhesive, Glass Transition Temperature

Processing and Troubleshooting Epoxy Adhesives and Encapsulants

Posted by Resin Designs Editor on Apr 6, 2020 11:30:00 AM

Two-component epoxies are versatile, viable adhesives and encapsulants that have demonstrated their value in the manufacture of electronics, medical devices, aerospace components, and many others. They provide superb electrical and mechanical properties along with the ability to resist extreme environments such as high and low temperatures and chemical exposure.

As part of our commitment to industry and customer support, we believe that our experience with two-component epoxies can be of value to manufacturers faced with certain processing and troubleshooting issues. While far from a comprehensive guide, we present below two common issues experienced when working with epoxies, as well as some tips on how to fix them.

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Topics: Epoxy Adhesives, troubleshooting, Encapsulants

5 Important Reasons Why You Should be Mindful of Glass Transitions Temperatures When Selecting an Epoxy Adhesive

Posted by Resin Designs Editor on Nov 8, 2017 11:03:00 AM

Unlike thermoplastic alternatives such as hot melt adhesives, cured thermosetting epoxies will not re-flow or melt when heated. Instead, epoxies will undergo a transition from a hard-rigid state to a more pliable, rubbery state. The temperature range during which this transition takes place is known as the glass transition temperature, Tg.

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Topics: Resin Designs, Epoxy Adhesives, Glass Transition